Delicious No Fail Fudge - White Chocolate and Caramel Fudge Recipe (2024)

by Dana

This post was most recently updated on March 2nd, 2020

So I can’t make traditional fudge. At all. I fail EVERY TIME (except that one time my sister helped me make it, and watched my every move). What I can do, however, is make this no fail fudge, White Chocolate and Caramel Fudge. It is amazing. Like hide-it-from-everyone-else amazing.

Please read: This information is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to treat, diagnose or prevent any disease. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

This post contains affiliate links, this means at no extra cost to you, we make a commission from sales. Please read our Disclosure Statement

No fail fudge is the best option for gifts for people that you don’t know what to buy for. They will ask you for this recipe, I promise it is that good. White chocolate and caramel is the ultimate combination for a sweet treat.

The technique making this fudge is different to traditional fudge, but the difference means that it takes the guess work out of how long to stir to melt the sugar, how long to boil to set point, how much to cool before beating and how long to beat it for. The genius is that the technique takes the difficult skill out of the recipe. Just follow the directions and it works!

No Fail Delicious White Chocolate and Caramel Fudge Recipe

Line a 20x20cm tin with baking paper.

Melt in a pot 125g (4 1/2 oz) of Butter.

Add 2 Tablespoons golden syrup, 1 Cup firmly packed brown sugar, 1x 375g (14 oz) tin of sweetened condensed milk.

Stir constantly over a medium heat until it starts to boil, turn it down to low and continue to stir and simmer for 10 more minutes.

Remove from the heat and add 1 Cup (or 4 1/2 oz) of white chocolate buttons/melts. Stir well until all the chocolate is mixed in and melted.

Pour into your prepared tin and pop in the fridge for 2 hours to set. Cut and hide it in your favourite hiding place. Consume within 10 days.

You are welcome.

You can switch it up a little and add 1/2 cup of chopped glace ginger. Or swap out the white chocolate buttons for dark chocolate ones and add 2 Tablespoons of cocoa into the pot while you are mixing in the sugar. Delicious!

Let me know in the comments if you have made this! What do you think?

Delicious No Fail Fudge - White Chocolate and Caramel Fudge Recipe (1)

White Chocolate and Caramel Fudge Recipe

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Additional Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes

This white chocolate and caramel fudge recipe is an amazing no fail fudge that is sure to impress!

Ingredients

  • 125g / 4.5 oz butter
  • 2 Tablespoons golden syrup (or corn syrup)
  • 1 Cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1 x 375g / 14oz can of sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 Cup / 100g / 4 oz white chocolate buttons/bits/drops

Instructions

Line a 20x20cm tin with baking paper.

Melt in a pot 125g (4 1/2 oz) of Butter.

Add 2 Tablespoons golden syrup, 1 Cup firmly packed brown sugar, 1x 375g (14 oz) tin of sweetened condensed milk.

Stir constantly over a medium heat until it starts to boil, turn it down to low and continue to stir and simmer for 10 more minutes.

Remove from the heat and add 1 Cup (or 4 1/2 oz) of white chocolate buttons/melts. Stir well until all the chocolate is mixed in and melted.

Pour into your prepared tin and pop in the fridge for 2 hours to set. Cut and hide it in your favourite hiding place. Consume within 10 days.

You are welcome.

Notes

You can switch it up a little and add 1/2 cup of chopped glace ginger. Or swap out the white chocolate buttons for dark chocolate ones and add 2 Tablespoons of cocoa into the pot while you are mixing in the sugar. Delicious!

Please Pin and Share with your Friends!

Delicious No Fail Fudge - White Chocolate and Caramel Fudge Recipe (2)

11 thoughts on “Delicious No Fail Fudge – White Chocolate and Caramel Fudge Recipe”

  1. Hi, what are the measurements for the sugar and chocolate? I’d love to make this’s a a gift for some special friends. Thanks ☺️

    Reply

    • I Emma, sorry for the confusion, C just means cup, I have corrected it to make it more clear.

      Reply

  2. The fudge looks wonderful and I would like to make it. What is golden syrup?

    Reply

    • Hi Linda – I have just discovered that golden syrup is a UK/colonies thing! According to a forum I saw, you can replace it with corn syrup, or buy it in the international section of your store. Golden syrup or light treacle is a thick, amber-coloured form of inverted sugar syrup made in the process of refining sugar cane or sugar beet juice into sugar, or by treatment of a sugar solution with acid, it tastes similar to brown sugar.

      Reply

  3. Thanks, putting the ginger in sounds like a great idea.
    Kathleen
    Blogger’s Pit Stop

    Reply

  4. We like to buy fudge when we vacation at the beach. I haven’t really made my own much.

    Reply

    • I always avoided making it – I bought it a lot though! Then I found this recipe, it is amazing!

      Reply

  5. That looks wonderful, I wish you delivered 🙂

    Reply

    • Hahaha Christine – It would be eaten before it got to the courier company!

      Reply

  6. I’ve never made white fudge… something just seems wrong about fudge being white! 🙂 However, I agree it looks great and I know my family would love it… especially the one son who does not like chocolate! Thank you for the recipe… and precise directions.

    Reply

    • It is so very yummy! I like a good dark fudge too, and in an experiment, I discovered that you can add 2 Tablespoons of cocoa to the pot and use dark chocolate buttons to make a very tasty brown chocolate fudge!

      Reply

Leave a comment

Delicious No Fail Fudge - White Chocolate and Caramel Fudge Recipe (2024)

FAQs

What is the secret to smooth fudge that is not gritty? ›

Once a seed crystal forms, it grows bigger and bigger as the fudge cools. A lot of big crystals in fudge makes it grainy. By letting the fudge cool without stirring, you avoid creating seed crystals.

Why didn't my white chocolate fudge set? ›

White chocolate doesn't set up like dark does, so you need to use a lot more of it -usually double the amount of dark that you'd usually use.

Why won't my 2 ingredient fudge set? ›

The main reason is that your Fudge has not reached the optimum temperature. If your mixture only reaches 110 or 112 degrees Celsius it will always be soft. That's why we recommend investing in a sugar thermometer. Another reason your Fudge is not setting is that the ratio of liquid to sugar is too high.

What not to do when making fudge? ›

7 Common Mistakes to Avoid for Candy Shop-Worthy Fudge and Caramels
  1. Using the Wrong Pan. All candy and confections start by melting sugar. ...
  2. Stirring the Sugar. ...
  3. Not Using a Candy Thermometer. ...
  4. Leaving Out the Parchment Paper Lining. ...
  5. Skipping the Cooking Spray. ...
  6. Scraping the Pot. ...
  7. Using a Cold Knife to Slice.
Dec 16, 2015

Is evaporated milk or condensed milk better for fudge? ›

Evaporated milk doesn't have sugar added. The sweetened condended milk is needed as no extra sugar is added to the fudge. If evaporated milk were used then the fudge would not be sweet enough and also would still be too soft unless the fudge is frozen.

Why did my fudge turn out like caramel? ›

Fudge can turn into caramel due to overcooking or undercooking, incorrect temperatures, or wrong ingredients.

How do you keep fudge creamy? ›

So, the key to smooth yet firm fudge, pralines, and fondant is to first bring the mixture to a high enough concentration and then let it cool off somewhat before starting to stir. And once you do start to stir, stir fanatically and without stopping for the finest, creamiest texture.

What makes fudge firmer? ›

Cooking is necessary to dissolve sugar crystals and to evaporate part of the water in the cream. The length of this step has a direct impact on the firmness of the fudge.

What if I forgot the vanilla in my fudge? ›

There are lots of fudge recipes around which don't use vanilla at all (it's a treat which is very open to experimentation in general). So if you don't add vanilla, it won't taste like vanilla, but that doesn't necessarily mean it will taste bad, have the wrong consistency or behave differently when cooked and cooled.

What happens if you boil fudge too long? ›

The amount of time you cook fudge directly affects its firmness. Too little time and the water won't evaporate, causing the fudge to be soft. Conversely, cook it too long and fudge won't contain enough water, making it hard with a dry, crumbly texture.

Can you redo fudge that didn't set? ›

OPTION 4) If you think the reason it didn't set was because you didn't heat it to the right temperature, you could try putting it back into the pan and re-cooking.

What keeps fudge from getting hard? ›

If you let your fudge get too hot, the sugars will start to concentrate and the fudge will be crumbly, dull, and hard. To fix it, put it back into the saucepan and add about 3–4 US tbsp (44–59 ml) of 35% fat whipping cream. Stir the mixture as you heat it until the sugar in the fudge is melted.

Why isn't my fudge creamy? ›

Fudge usually behaves this way when it's not cooked to a high enough temperature (due to oversight or a faulty candy thermometer). If your fudge is tough, hard, or grainy, then you may have made one of several mistakes: You may have overcooked it, beaten it too long, or neglected to cool it to the proper temperature.

How do I know if my fudge is going to set? ›

Remove the ball from the water and check its consistency with your fingers. For perfect fudge, the syrup should form a soft ball that can be picked up, but easily flattened. If the syrup is undercooked, drops of syrup will sink to the bottom of the glass in threads or simply dissolve.

What makes high quality fudge? ›

You have to control two temperatures to make successful fudge: the cooking temperature AND the temperature at which the mixture cools before stirring to make it crystallize. Confectionery experiments have shown that the ideal cooking temperature for fudge is around 114 to 115 °C (237 to 239 °F).

Do you stir fudge while it is boiling? ›

Brush the sides of the pan with a wet brush at the beginning of cooking to dissolve sugar crystals stuck to the sides. Never stir the mixture during cooking or sugar could crystallize again. The mixture may seize and become grainy. Use a candy thermometer or conduct a cold water test to check if the fudge is done.

What does cream of tartar do in fudge? ›

Cream of tartar is used in caramel sauces and fudge to help prevent the sugar from crystallizing while cooking. It also prevents cooling sugars from forming brittle crystals, this is why it's the secret ingredient in snickerdoodles!

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Kieth Sipes

Last Updated:

Views: 6033

Rating: 4.7 / 5 (67 voted)

Reviews: 82% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Kieth Sipes

Birthday: 2001-04-14

Address: Suite 492 62479 Champlin Loop, South Catrice, MS 57271

Phone: +9663362133320

Job: District Sales Analyst

Hobby: Digital arts, Dance, Ghost hunting, Worldbuilding, Kayaking, Table tennis, 3D printing

Introduction: My name is Kieth Sipes, I am a zany, rich, courageous, powerful, faithful, jolly, excited person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.